Strictly Come Care Planning

The following ideas resulted from an email conversation about care planning. The discussion included some ideas about practitioners dancing with people rather than dictating the care planning conversation. The focus of the House of Care is the collaborative care planning conversation at the centre. Graham Kramer (a GP and self-confessed dad-dancer) reflects on his own experience of care planning conversations:

“I’m drawn to Year of Care’s metaphor of Care and Support Planning (CSP) being a dance. The outcome is hugely dependent on the confidence, skills etc. of each individual and their ability to interact. The more they practice together the better they will be, however skillful one is it will be held back by the lesser skills of the other. Each needs to help and support each other to bring out the best of the double act.

I see the pre-consultation sharing of results very much akin to giving the patient some choreographic notes beforehand. It will help a little but measuring its impact on the overall dance performance will probably prove disappointing and irrelevant. There is a need to measure the dance performance in the context of all the other elements (including lights, music, dance shoes, sequins etc). Some of our patients will be Jill Halfpennys but many will be John Sergeants. More importantly most of their professional dance partners have, up until now, been skilled in a different technical dance paradigm and are needing to learn Ballroom!

Occasionally I’m like Anton du Beke… but all too often relapse into (paternalistic) Dad dancing!”

But seriously – let’s make a step-change and transform every care planning conversation into a harmonious waltz or a foxtrot.

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Strictly Come Care Planning

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